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The Meaning of Per Se

If a law enforcement officer suspects that you are driving under the influence, you will be signaled to pull over to the side of the road. You may be administered a number of field sobriety tests or asked to take a roadside breathalyzer. During a breathalyzer exam, you blow into a machine that measures the alcohol content of your breath and converts it into the alcohol content of your blood.

You may have heard of what is known as the “legal limit.” This phrase applies to the legal amount of alcohol allowed in your body while you are operating a motorized vehicle. In all 50 states, the legal limit is 0.08%. This means that if your blood alcohol content level is above 0.08%, then you are considered to be driving while intoxicated and may be charged with DUI.

Washington is one of the initial 19 states that approved what are known as the 0.08% BAC per se laws. Under this legislation, it does not matter whether or not you are showing any signs of intoxication or impairment; if your BAC level is above the legal limit, you will be charged with DUI. Because of this, fighting a per se DUI charge can be more difficult than one made based on a driver's actions.

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Fortunately, the Seattle DUI lawyers of Cowan Kirk Kattenhorn have the experience necessary to help defend you against per se charges. Contact us today at 1-866-822-1230 to speak with an attorney about your legal rights and options.

Cowan Kirk Kattenhorn

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Cowan Kirk Kattenhorn is known throughout Washington and the nation for representing all of its clients with commitment, creativity and compassion. We recognize how devastating a DUI charge can be, particularly when our clients learn how incredibly tough Washington's DUI laws have become, even for a first-time offender.

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If you need a DUI defense attorney in Seattle, Bellevue, or King County, contact us today to find out why respect for our clients, a passion for justice, and our commitment to winning have earned each of us the highest honor a member of the bar can receive from our colleagues – their referrals.